Bonnyclabber Cheese Company at Sullivan's Pond Farm

Have you tried Bonnyclabber Cheese yet?  This fresh goat cheese is made by Tim and Rona Sullivan on their farm, where  the Rappahanock River meets the Chesapeake Bay.  The natural packaging makes this cheese instantly recognizable- since cheese is ever evolving, encasing it in corn husks or fig leaves enables it to breathe and develop.  We currently carry the Sandy Bottom (coated in salt and pepper), Rocky Mount (covered in herbs and spicy peppers), as well as the Moonshine (wrapped in moonshine- soaked corn husks).  You can learn more about the Sullivan's farm and cheese on their website.

Fresh goat cheese coated in herbs, salt and pepper or a moonshine soaked husk

Fresh goat cheese coated in herbs, salt and pepper or a moonshine soaked husk

Harvesting the all- natural packaging

Harvesting the all- natural packaging

Tim and Rona Sullivan

Tim and Rona Sullivan

Happy goats

Happy goats

Cheese!

Last week, I traveled to northwestern Virginia for a tour of Everona Dairy.  
Everona is one of the only sheep’s milk dairies in VA, and boy, do they make fantastic cheese.  Flavorful and sophisticated but without pretense, their cheese consistently wins awards, yet is not easy to find in RVA.  I, of course, am hoping they’ll sell at Little House…
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The cheese is absolutely incredible.  These are aged cheeses, with characteristics of asiago (Piedmont) or reggiano (Stonyman).  The Marble is so classic, with its vein of blue prompted by a layer of ash pressed into the cheese.


Look at that gorgeous blue!  

You can visit Everona Dairy by setting up an appointment.   Learn what goes into cheese making, straight from the farm!

“We are producing award-winning sheep’s milk cheese - aged, washed-rind, and unpasteurized.  As simple as it gets.  It is exciting to introduce people to the complexities of good cheese.  We are trying to “spread the word” bite by bite.  Always looking for ways to improve our products, at Everona we strive to continue the tradition of artisan cheesemaking techniques while keeping up with the growing demand for local, farmstead cheeses.”


And, just as an aside, wool makes a fantastic mulch! Who knew?