August 26

From Tricycle Gardens

  • Okra

From Tomten Farm

  • Garlic
  • Chiogga Beets
  • Long beans

Manakintowne Specialty Growers

  • Juliet tomatoes
  • Pattypan Squash

From Agriberry

  • Peaches
  • Red Raspberries

"A simple Southern classic! Okra is dredged in seasoned cornmeal, then fried until golden."
 

EASY FRIED OKRA

From Allrecipes,com

Ingredients

  • 10 pods okra, sliced in 1/4 inch pieces
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil

Directions
In a small bowl, soak okra in egg for 5 to 10 minutes. In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal, salt, and pepper.
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Dredge okra in the cornmeal mixture, coating evenly. Carefully place okra in hot oil; stir continuously. Reduce heat to medium when okra first starts to brown, and cook until golden. Drain on paper towels.

GREEK STYLE GREEN BEANS 

from TheSplendidTable.org

Lynne Rosetto- Casper says: The traditional Greek recipes in which this method is rooted use as much as three quarters of a cup of olive oil -- too much for me. The few tablespoons here give flavor and allow the green beans to caramelize. Pretty they are not, but with one bite that is moot. Back in my restaurant days, I once received a proposal of marriage from a guest on the basis of these green beans.

Pay careful attention to the details here. Technique is all.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh green beans, tipped and tailed
  • Vegetable oil cooking spray
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • About 1 tablespoon medium to finely chopped garlic (5 or 6 cloves)
  • 1 large fresh tomato, chopped (I go ahead and leave the skin on and seeds in; if you are fussier than me, remove both and use only the chopped pulp of 2 tomatoes)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • A few dashes of cayenne
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon dried dill

Instructions

1. Blanch the green beans: Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When the water is boiling, add the green beans and cook for 2 minutes. Drain them well, then rinse with cold water, and drain them again.

2. Spray a large, heavy (preferably cast iron) skillet with a tight-fitting cover with oil, and set it over very low heat. Add the olive oil, scatter the garlic over it, and add the blanched green beans (in contrast to most sautes, the green beans are added when neither pan, nor oil, nor garlic, is yet hot). Scatter the tomato over the beans. Don’t stir.

3. Still keeping the heat as low as possible, cover the beans and let them just barely cook, without stirring, for about 40 minutes. I know it’s hard, but keep on not stirring; leave the heat low enough so that nothing burns. If you like, you can push a few beans back to check on the garlic at the bottom of the skillet. It should not be browning, merely cooking very, very slowly. Some of the beans will be browned on oneside, which is good. If this hasn’t happened yet, cover again and cook for 10, even 15, minutes more.

4. When the beans are soft, lift the lid and stir gently. It is unlikely, but if there’s a noticeable amount of liquid in the skillet, turn the heat up and, stirring gently but constantly, evaporate the liquid off. You want soft, barely-holding-together green beans. They should be slightly shriveled-looking and browned lightly here and there, with a bit of the garlic-tomato jam sticking to them.

5. Turn off the heat. Salt and pepper the beans, sprinkle them with the cayenne and dill, stir one more time, and serve. No, no, you don’t have to thank me.